Software sorts law firm papers

When lawyers compose legal documents or gather copies of court cases and other transcripts, they generate paper — almost countless sheets of the stuff.

Simon Aleman, president of iDea Mill Technologies Inc., experienced the piles firsthand while working for a litigation support group. When he decided to open a software company, taming the mess was the goal of his first product, Breeze.

“A lot of the time, the turnaround for litigation support takes a day or two,” he said. “With Breeze, the firm can do all the sorting themselves.”

Aleman said his Tulsa company finished Breeze just two months ago but already has sold it to 50 law firms across the nation. At $850 a copy, he said, the price is low for such specialized software.

At its core, Breeze is a sorting program. When physical documents are scanned in, Breeze sorts them and stamps them with page numbers and notes, such as “confidential.” Breeze also uses optical character recognition to transform image files into text files and vice versa.

When finished, the information can be stored digitally, rather than in filing cabinets.

To persuade law firms to use Breeze for performing tasks that formerly were outsourced, Aleman said he made the interface as simple as possible.

“Any paralegal, secretary or lawyer can figure out how to use it in five minutes,” he said.

Aleman hopes Breeze will help his company grow from six people to 15 by the end of the year. He’s also looking for investors to raise the $100,000 in required matching funds for a grant that Breeze recently obtained from the Technology Business Finance Program at the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology.

Aleman said he’s not aware of a similar product on the market, though he expects that competition will surface soon.

“We know we have to establish the market quickly and become the Brand A,” he said.

© Copyright 2009, Robert Evatt The Tulsa World

1 comment (Add your own)

1. Sophie wrote:
The GREENVILLE community will never be able to erpexss adequately its gratitude to Jackson's Drug Store. Back in 1993 we held a community meeting at the Greenville Sr. Citizen's Building and invited the Jackson's to attend. The room was full of concerned citizens needing the drug store to re-open for the common good of our community and the heart of downtown. The Jackson Family took a chance on us and came!Once the OPEN sign was turned at Jackson's GREENVILLE, Danny became an active participant in our community. He created alliances with those of us who were working to better the business climate, the medical resources available and the various after-school activities. His help came in various ways: doing, sponsoring or allowing his staff the time off to contribute their talents to the project. He has served on a number of community boards through the years in Greenville and has done so with patience, professionalism and class.Our homebound senior citizens will struggle without Jackson's. It is true! Still in 2011, they were providing home delivery for those without transportation to downtown who needed the service. Neighbors and family will have to step up to help our elderly navigate the new world they're about to enter in to. IT WILL NOT BE THE SAME.I cannot bring myself to visit on the last day of business here. So I will only say: THANK YOU DANNY! THANK YOU GREENVILLE LADIES and THANK YOU JACKSON FAMILY!

Tue, December 11, 2012 @ 10:54 PM

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